Category Archives: RTOS

Security and Connected Devices

Andy McCormick

Andy McCormick

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
I provide expertise and training for Embedded Linux courses.

I have over 20 years of experience in the embedded sector, gained at companies such as Pace, Open TV and Sony Semiconductor Europe.

I've led work on numerous projects at all stages in the design cycle with comprehensive expertise in software engineering design, support and integration.
Andy McCormick

Latest posts by Andy McCormick (see all)

With the Internet of Things, we are seeing more and more devices that were traditionally “deep embedded” and isolated from the outside world becoming connected devices. Security needs to be designed into connected products from the outset as the risk of outside attacks is very real. This is especially true if you’re migrating from embedded RTOS systems to Linux and encountering a smorgasbord of “free” connectivity functionality for the first time.

Here we list 10 top tips to help make your […]

Posted in General, Industry Analysis, Linux, RTOS, training | Tagged | 1 Comment

Debunking priority

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Before I start, a disclaimer:

For the purposes of this article I’m limiting the discussion to even-driven systems on priority-based, pre-emptive operating systems, on single processors.

I’m using the word task to mean ‘unit of execution’ or ‘unit of schedulability’, in preference to thread or process. I’m ignoring the different OS memory models.

There seems to be a fair amount of misunderstanding about the concept of priority in concurrent programming:

Priority means one task is more ’important’ than another.
Priority allows one task to […]

Posted in Design Issues, RTOS | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

CMSIS-RTOS Presentation

Niall Cooling

Director at Feabhas Limited
Co-Founder and Director of Feabhas since 1995.
Niall has been designing and programming embedded systems for over 30 years. He has worked in different sectors, including aerospace, telecomms, government and banking.
His current interest lie in IoT Security and Agile for Embedded Systems.

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I have finally finished and sent off my presentation for next weeks Hitex one-day ARM User Conferences titled “ARM – the new standard across the board?” at the National Motorcycle Museum in Solihull.

Back in February, at the embeddedworld exhibition and conference in Nuremberg, Germany, ARM announced the latest version (version 3) of the Cortex(tm) Microcontroller Software Interface Standard (CMSIS). The major addition is the introduction of an abstraction layer for Real-Time Operating Systems (RTOS).

The presentation I’m giving explains; what […]

Posted in ARM, CMSIS, Cortex, General, RTOS | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

EMBEDDED PROGRAMMERS’ GUIDE TO THE ARM CORTEX-M ARCHITECTURE

Niall Cooling

Director at Feabhas Limited
Co-Founder and Director of Feabhas since 1995.
Niall has been designing and programming embedded systems for over 30 years. He has worked in different sectors, including aerospace, telecomms, government and banking.
His current interest lie in IoT Security and Agile for Embedded Systems.

Latest posts by Niall Cooling (see all)

At Embedded Live 2010 I shall be presenting a half-day tutorial entitled “EMBEDDED PROGRAMMERS’ GUIDE TO THE ARM CORTEX-M ARCHITECTURE”.

Feabhas have been training embedded software engineers in languages and architectures for the last 15 years. For the last decade we have been using ARM based target systems for all our programming based courses (C, C++ and testing – ARM7TDMI) and embedded Linux courses (ARM926). However with the development and release of the new generation Cortex micros we are moving our […]

Posted in C/C++ Programming, General, RTOS, training | 1 Comment

Task Synchronisation – Part 2: Multiple Tasks and RTOS APIs

First off, apologies for the delay in this follow up to the previous post Task Synchronisation, it has been a mad couple off weeks with a combination of vacation and work.
In the previous post I looked at the foundation of task synchronization demonstrating there are  range of synchronisation models (bilateral/unilateral, persistent/non-persistent, etc.). In this post I shall look at multi-task synchronisation and then investigate specific RTOS APIs.

MULTIPLE TASKS WAITING
So far we have only dealt with the simple case of two […]

Posted in RTOS | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Task Synchronisation

Synchronisation is an everyday event, both in the real-world and the computer program. For example meeting a friend for a coffee requires synchronisation, in that both parties need to arrive within a given timeframe to make the event worthwhile (sometimes referred to as a rendezvous – however this tends to have more romantic implications). Alternatively, receiving a PO via fax is a form of synchronisation. The company waiting on the PO will-not/cannot start working on the project until this […]

Posted in RTOS | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Mutex vs. Semaphores – Part 3 (final part): Mutual Exclusion Problems

As hopefully you can see from the previous posting, the mutex is a significantly safer mechanism to use for implementing mutual exclusion around shared resources. Nevertheless, there are still a couple of problems that use of the mutex (in preference to the semaphore) will not solve. These are:

Circular deadlock
Non-cooperation

Circular Deadlock
Circular deadlock, often referred to as the “deadly embrace” problem is a condition where two or more tasks develop a circular dependency of mutual exclusion. Simply put, one task is blocked […]

Posted in RTOS | Tagged , , , , , | 10 Comments

Mutex vs. Semaphores – Part 2: The Mutex

In Part 1 of this series we looked at the history of the binary and counting semaphore, and then went on to discuss some of the associated problem areas. In this posting I aim to show how a different RTOS construct, the mutex, may overcome some, if not all, of these weaknesses.

To address the problems associated with semaphore, a new concept was developed during the late 1980’s. I have struggled to find it’s first clear definition, but the major use […]

Posted in RTOS | Tagged , , , | 16 Comments

Mutex vs. Semaphores – Part 1: Semaphores

It never ceases to amaze me how often I see postings in newsgroups, etc. asking the difference between a semaphore and a mutex. Probably what baffles me more is that over 90% of the time the responses given are either incorrect or missing the key differences. The most often quoted response is that of the “The Toilet Example (c) Copyright 2005, Niclas Winquist” . This summarises the differences as:

A mutex is really a semaphore with value 1

No, no and no […]

Posted in RTOS | Tagged , , , | 25 Comments