Author Archives: Niall Cooling

About Niall Cooling

Co-Founder and Director of Feabhas since 1995. Niall has been designing and programming embedded systems for over 30 years. He has worked in different sectors, including aerospace, telecomms, government and banking. His current interest lie in IoT Security and Agile for Embedded Systems.

Code Quality – Cyclomatic Complexity

In the standard ISO 26262-6:2011 [1] the term “complexity” appears a number of times, generally in the context of reducing or lowering said complexity.

There are many different ways of defining “complexity”, for example, Fred Brooks, in his 1986 landmark paper, “No Silver Bullet — Essence and Accidents of Software Engineering” asserts that there are two types of complexity; Essential and Accidental. [2]

Rather than getting into esoteric discussion about design complexity, I’d like to focus on code complexity.

Over the years, I […]

Posted in Agile, C/C++ Programming, General, Testing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Bugs do matter…(unsurprisingly)

Welcome to 2018! How did that happen?

Thank you to everyone who attended last week’s webinar on “Measuring Software Quality“, and thank you for the positive feedback, it really does help us shape our future webinars/blogs.

During the talk, I discussed a suggestion by Sally Globe,  along the lines of “Bugs don’t matter”/”Perfect software is the enemy of rapid deployment” as long as you are “Not wrong long”, which came from an initial exchange on Twitter back last year:The caveat was this […]

Posted in Agile, Industry Analysis, Testing | Tagged , | Leave a comment

An Introduction to Docker for Embedded Developers – Part 4 Reducing Docker Image Size

In Part 3  we managed to build a Docker image containing the tools required to compile and link C/C++ code destined for our embedded Arm target system. However, we’ve paid little attention to the size of the image. Doing a quick Docker image listing we can see its grown to a whopping 2.14GB:

$ docker image ls
REPOSITORY TAG IMAGE ID […]

Posted in Agile, ARM, C/C++ Programming, Cortex, Testing | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

An Introduction to Docker for Embedded Developers – Part 3 Cross-Compiling for Cortex-M

In the previous posting we looked at defining a custom Dockerfile where we can add specific tools (and their dependencies). From that we created a Docker image and this allowed us to build C/C++ code in a Docker container, ensuring a consistent build environment.

So far we have to build all our code using the native GCC toolchain which is part of the base Docker image (gcc:7.2). However, I want to be able to build an image I can download and run […]

Posted in Agile, ARM, C/C++ Programming, Cortex, Testing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

An Introduction to Docker for Embedded Developers – Part 2 Building Images

In the initial post, we covered the basics of getting Docker setup and using an official base image for compilation.
But let’s suppose the base image doesn’t include all the facilities our company uses for development. For example, we have migrated from make files to CMake, but more lately we have taken to using the python-based Scons build system for C/C++ projects.
The official gcc base image supports make but not Scons or CMake. As before, we can search for a Scons docker […]

Posted in Agile, General | Tagged , | 3 Comments

An Introduction to Docker for Embedded Developers – Part 1 Getting Started

Docker is a relatively new technology, only appearing just over four years ago. The core building blocks have always been part of Unix; but the significant support, Linux containers (LCX), first appeared back in 2008.

Initially Docker was only supported on Linux, but more recently native support for OSX (my development OS of choice) and Windows (albeit Windows 10 Pro) suddenly opens up some interesting workflow choices.

The “What”

So, first, what is Docker? I’m always trying to find the right words here […]

Posted in Agile, Design Issues, Testing | 2 Comments

‘Abusing’ the C switch statement – beauty is in the eye of the beholder

The C Language

Before we start, let’s get something straight; for over 30 years now I have had a love-hate relationship with the C programming language. The ‘engineer’ in me[1] sometimes just cannot believe we are still using C as the dominant embedded programming languages after all these years, and yet, I also see the simplicity and elegance the C code can bring. After all it’s just a tool, and even a good tool in the wrong hands; well we have plenty […]

Posted in C/C++ Programming | Tagged , , | 30 Comments

Function Parameters and Arguments on 32-bit ARM

Function call basics

When teaching classes about embedded C  or embedded C++ programming, one of the topics we always address is “Where does the memory come from for function arguments?“

Take the following simple C function:

void test_function(int a, int b, int c, int d);

when we invoke the function, where are the function arguments stored?

int main(void)
{
  //…
  test_function(1,2,3,4);
  //…
}

Unsurprisingly, the most common answer after “I don’t know” is “the stack“; and of course if you were compiling for x86 this would […]

Posted in ARM, C/C++ Programming, Cortex | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

My Top 5 Podcasts

For the final blog post of the year I’ve decided to do something a little different; I hope that’s okay?

Due to the nature of the job, the technical team at Feabhas spend a lot of time travelling. This means many an hour spent in the car driving to and from client sites; often involving navigating the wonderful M25 London orbital [car park!]. We all while away this time in different ways, some prefer music, others radio (which, being in the […]

Posted in General | Tagged | Leave a comment

Vulnerabilities in C : When integers go bad!

Insecure C?

We are at the dawn of a new era of connected embedded devices, broadly being marketed as the “Internet of Things” (IoT). The majority of these systems are likely to be programmed using C/C++. To date, much of the embedded world has been connected to propriety networks, however with the gold rush in to IoT we are not going to be able to rely on “Security through Obscurity“. This is the first in a series of articles looking […]

Posted in C/C++ Programming | Tagged | 2 Comments