Tag Archives: Modern C++

Contract killing (in Modern C++)

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

If you work in high-integrity or safety-critical software then you have a duty-of-care to:

Ensure your code does what it should
Ensure your code doesn’t do what it’s not supposed to.

Moreover, you’re typically required to both demonstrate and document how you’ve achieved this duty-of-care. Typical mechanisms for demonstrating compliance include unit testing and static analysis; documentation usually includes function specifications and test results. The amount of testing, static analysis and documentation you (have to) do depends on the integrity level of your […]

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Brace initialization of user-defined types

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Uniform initialization syntax is one of my favourite features of Modern C++.  I think it’s important, in good quality code, to clearly distinguish between initialization and assignment.

When it comes to user-defined types – structures and classes – brace initialization can throw up a few unexpected issues, and some counter-intuitive results (and errors!).

In this article, I want to have a look at some of the issues with brace initialization of user-defined types – specifically, brace elision and initializer_lists.

Read on for more…

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Thanks for the memory (allocator)

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

One of the design goals of Modern C++ is to find new ways – better, more effective – of doing things we could already do in C++.  Some might argue this is one of the more frustrating aspects of Modern C++ – if it works, don’t fix it (alternatively: why use lightbulbs when we have perfectly good candles?!)

This time we’ll look at a new aspect of Modern C++:  the Allocator model for dynamic containers.  This is currently experimental, but has […]

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A brief introduction to Concepts – Part 2

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

In part 1 of this article we looked at adding requirements to parameters in template code to improve the diagnostic ability of the compiler.  (I’d recommend reading this article first, if you haven’t already)

Previously, we looked at a simple example of adding a small number of requirements on a template parameter to introduce the syntax and semantics.  In reality, the constraints imposed on a template parameter could consist of any combination of

Type traits
Required type aliases
Required member attributes
Required member functions

Explicitly listing […]

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A brief introduction to Concepts – Part 1

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Templates are an extremely powerful – and terrifying – element of C++ programs.  I say “terrifying” – not because templates are particularly hard to use (normally), or even particularly complex to write (normally) – but because when things go wrong the compiler’s output is a tsunami of techno-word-salad that can overwhelm even the experienced programmer.

The problem with generic code is that it isn’t completely generic.  That is, generic code cannot be expected to work on every possible type we could […]

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“May Not Meet Developer Expectations” #77

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Question:  Does the following compile?

int func()
{
  int (func);
  return

Posted in C/C++ Programming | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Exceptional fun!

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

In this article I want to look at some applications for one of C++’s more obscure mechanisms, the function

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Making things do stuff – Part 9

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

As a final instalment in this series on hardware manipulation I thought I’d revisit read-only and write-only register types.

Using tag dispatch is not the only way to solve the read- or write-only Register problem.  For completeness let’s explore two other alternatives – SFINAE and constexpr if.

For these examples I’m going to use a simplified version of our Register class.  I’m ignoring the bit proxy class and using a reduced API.  Once understood, the techniques below can be applied to these […]

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Making things do stuff – Part 2

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Last time we looked at the basics of hardware manipulation in C++.   This time we’ll apply this to some real hardware and have a look at the code

Posted in C/C++ Programming, Cortex, General | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Great Expectations

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Previously, we’ve looked at the basic concepts of function parameter passing, and we’ve looked at the mechanics of how parameters are passed at the Application Binary Interface (ABI) level.

Far too often we focus on the mechanisms and efficiency of parameter passing, with the goal: if it’s efficient then it’s good; that’s all there is to it.  In this article I want to move past simple mechanics and start to explore function parameter design intent – that is, what can I […]

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