Tag Archives: Modern C++

A brief introduction to Concepts – Part 2

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

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In part 1 of this article we looked at adding requirements to parameters in template code to improve the diagnostic ability of the compiler.  (I’d recommend reading this article first, if you haven’t already)

Previously, we looked at a simple example of adding a small number of requirements on a template parameter to introduce the syntax and semantics.  In reality, the constraints imposed on a template parameter could consist of any combination of

Type traits
Required type aliases
Required member attributes
Required member functions

Explicitly listing […]

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A brief introduction to Concepts – Part 1

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Templates are an extremely powerful – and terrifying – element of C++ programs.  I say “terrifying” – not because templates are particularly hard to use (normally), or even particularly complex to write (normally) – but because when things go wrong the compiler’s output is a tsunami of techno-word-salad that can overwhelm even the experienced programmer.

The problem with generic code is that it isn’t completely generic.  That is, generic code cannot be expected to work on every possible type we could […]

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“May Not Meet Developer Expectations” #77

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Question:  Does the following compile?

int func()
{
  int (func);
  return

Posted in C/C++ Programming | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Exceptional fun!

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

In this article I want to look at some applications for one of C++’s more obscure mechanisms, the function

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Making things do stuff – Part 9

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

As a final instalment in this series on hardware manipulation I thought I’d revisit read-only and write-only register types.

Using tag dispatch is not the only way to solve the read- or write-only Register problem.  For completeness let’s explore two other alternatives – SFINAE and constexpr if.

For these examples I’m going to use a simplified version of our Register class.  I’m ignoring the bit proxy class and using a reduced API.  Once understood, the techniques below can be applied to these […]

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Making things do stuff – Part 2

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Last time we looked at the basics of hardware manipulation in C++.   This time we’ll apply this to some real hardware and have a look at the code

Posted in C/C++ Programming, Cortex, General | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Great Expectations

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Previously, we’ve looked at the basic concepts of function parameter passing, and we’ve looked at the mechanics of how parameters are passed at the Application Binary Interface (ABI) level.

Far too often we focus on the mechanisms and efficiency of parameter passing, with the goal: if it’s efficient then it’s good; that’s all there is to it.  In this article I want to move past simple mechanics and start to explore function parameter design intent – that is, what can I […]

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Becoming a Rule of Zero Hero

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

“Do, or do not; there is no ‘try’.”

Previously, we’ve looked at The Rule of Zero which, in essence, says: avoid doing your own resource management; use a pre-defined resource-managing type instead.

This is an excellent guideline and can significantly improve the quality of your application code. However, there are some circumstances where you might not get exactly what you were expecting. It’s not that the code will fail; it just might not be as efficient as you thought.

Luckily, the solution is […]

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Bitesize Modern C++: using aliases

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

In a C++ program it is common to create type aliases using typedef. A type alias is not a new type, simply a new name for an existing declaration. Used carefully, typedef can improve the readability and maintainability of code – particularly when dealing with complex declarations.

In C++11 typedef can be replaced with a using-alias. This performs the same function as a typedef; although the syntax is (arguably) more readable. A using-alias can be used wherever a typedef could be […]

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Bitesize Modern C++: nullptr

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

What’s the value of a null pointer?

0
NULL
NUL

No doubt you’ve been involved in the (always heated) discussions about which is the correct one (By the way, if you said NUL you need to take yourself to one side and give yourself a stern talking to).

The arguments tend to go something like this:

0 is the only ‘well-known’ value a pointer can be set to that can be checked.
NULL is more explicit than just writing zero (even though it is just a […]

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