Category Archives: C/C++ Programming

Using a Raspberry Pi as a remote headless J-Link Server

Niall Cooling

Director at Feabhas Limited
Co-Founder and Director of Feabhas since 1995.
Niall has been designing and programming embedded systems for over 30 years. He has worked in different sectors, including aerospace, telecomms, government and banking.
His current interest lie in IoT Security and Agile for Embedded Systems.

Here at Feabhas we tend to favour using Segger J-Link’s as our ‘go-to’ solution for target flashing and debug, as they fall into that category of tools that just work.

As part of our ongoing work around Agile and CI (Continuous Integration), we’re always interested in addressing that challenging step of automating target based test in a cost-effective manner.

The Raspberry Pi (RPi) is a ubiquitous low-cost platform for numerous tasks. One useful tasks that it can be used for is as […]

Posted in Agile, ARM, C/C++ Programming, Testing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Brace initialization of user-defined types

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Uniform initialization syntax is one of my favourite features of Modern C++.  I think it’s important, in good quality code, to clearly distinguish between initialization and assignment.

When it comes to user-defined types – structures and classes – brace initialization can throw up a few unexpected issues, and some counter-intuitive results (and errors!).

In this article, I want to have a look at some of the issues with brace initialization of user-defined types – specifically, brace elision and initializer_lists.

Read on for more…

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Posted in C/C++ Programming, General | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Thanks for the memory (allocator)

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

One of the design goals of Modern C++ is to find new ways – better, more effective – of doing things we could already do in C++.  Some might argue this is one of the more frustrating aspects of Modern C++ – if it works, don’t fix it (alternatively: why use lightbulbs when we have perfectly good candles?!)

This time we’ll look at a new aspect of Modern C++:  the Allocator model for dynamic containers.  This is currently experimental, but has […]

Posted in C/C++ Programming, General | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Peripheral register access using C Struct’s – part 1

Niall Cooling

Director at Feabhas Limited
Co-Founder and Director of Feabhas since 1995.
Niall has been designing and programming embedded systems for over 30 years. He has worked in different sectors, including aerospace, telecomms, government and banking.
His current interest lie in IoT Security and Agile for Embedded Systems.

When working with peripherals, we need to be able to read and write to the device’s internal registers. How we achieve this in C depends on whether we’re working with memory-mapped IO or port-mapped IO. Port-mapped IO typically requires compiler/language extensions, whereas memory-mapped IO can be accommodated with the standard C syntax.

Embedded “Hello, World!”

We all know the embedded equivalent of the “Hello, world!” program is flashing the LED, so true to form I’m going to use that as an example.

The […]

Posted in ARM, C/C++ Programming, CMSIS, Cortex | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

A brief introduction to Concepts – Part 2

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

In part 1 of this article we looked at adding requirements to parameters in template code to improve the diagnostic ability of the compiler.  (I’d recommend reading this article first, if you haven’t already)

Previously, we looked at a simple example of adding a small number of requirements on a template parameter to introduce the syntax and semantics.  In reality, the constraints imposed on a template parameter could consist of any combination of

Type traits
Required type aliases
Required member attributes
Required member functions

Explicitly listing […]

Posted in C/C++ Programming | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

A brief introduction to Concepts – Part 1

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Templates are an extremely powerful – and terrifying – element of C++ programs.  I say “terrifying” – not because templates are particularly hard to use (normally), or even particularly complex to write (normally) – but because when things go wrong the compiler’s output is a tsunami of techno-word-salad that can overwhelm even the experienced programmer.

The problem with generic code is that it isn’t completely generic.  That is, generic code cannot be expected to work on every possible type we could […]

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An Introduction to Docker for Embedded Developers – Part 5 Multi-Stage Builds

Niall Cooling

Director at Feabhas Limited
Co-Founder and Director of Feabhas since 1995.
Niall has been designing and programming embedded systems for over 30 years. He has worked in different sectors, including aerospace, telecomms, government and banking.
His current interest lie in IoT Security and Agile for Embedded Systems.

Following on from the previous post, where we spent time reducing the docker image size, in this post I’d like to cover a couple of useful practices to further improve our docker image:

Copying local files rather than pulling from the web
Simplifying builds using a multi-stage build

Copying in Local Files

So far, when installing the GCC-Arm compiler, we have pulled it from the web using wget. This technique can suffer from two issues:

Web links are notoriously fragile
https adds complexity to the packages […]

Posted in Agile, ARM, C/C++ Programming, Testing | Tagged , | 5 Comments

Updated: Developing a Generic Hard Fault handler for ARM Cortex-M3/Cortex-M4 using GCC

Niall Cooling

Director at Feabhas Limited
Co-Founder and Director of Feabhas since 1995.
Niall has been designing and programming embedded systems for over 30 years. He has worked in different sectors, including aerospace, telecomms, government and banking.
His current interest lie in IoT Security and Agile for Embedded Systems.

The original article was first posted back in 2013. Since posting I have been contacted many times regarding the article. One re-occuring question has been “How do I do this using GCC?”. So I thought it was about time I updated the article using GCC.

GNU Tools for ARM Embedded Processors

The original article used the Keil toolchain, here I am using arm-none-eabi-gcc. One of the major benefits of CMSIS is that almost all the code from the original posting will compile […]

Posted in ARM, C/C++ Programming, CMSIS, Cortex | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Code Quality – Cyclomatic Complexity

Niall Cooling

Director at Feabhas Limited
Co-Founder and Director of Feabhas since 1995.
Niall has been designing and programming embedded systems for over 30 years. He has worked in different sectors, including aerospace, telecomms, government and banking.
His current interest lie in IoT Security and Agile for Embedded Systems.

In the standard ISO 26262-6:2011 [1] the term “complexity” appears a number of times, generally in the context of reducing or lowering said complexity.

There are many different ways of defining “complexity”, for example, Fred Brooks, in his 1986 landmark paper, “No Silver Bullet — Essence and Accidents of Software Engineering” asserts that there are two types of complexity; Essential and Accidental. [2]

Rather than getting into esoteric discussion about design complexity, I’d like to focus on code complexity.

Over the years, I […]

Posted in Agile, C/C++ Programming, General, Testing | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Your handy cut-out-and-keep guide to std::forward and std::move

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

I love a good ‘quadrant’ diagram.  It brings me immense joy if I can encapsulate some wisdom, guideline or rule-of-thumb in a simple four-quadrant picture.

This time it’s the when-and-where of std::move and std::forward.  In my experience, when programmers are first introduced to move semantics, their biggest struggle is to know when (or when not) to apply std::move or std::forward.  Usually, it’s a case of “keep apply std::move until it compiles”.  I’ve been there myself.

To that end I’ve put together a […]

Posted in C/C++ Programming | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments