Tag Archives: Use Case

The Baker’s Dozen of Use Cases

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Rule 11 – Don’t abuse «include»

A use case contains all the steps (transactions) needed to describe how the actor (our stakeholder) achieves their goal (or doesn’t; depending on the particular conditions of the scenario). Therefore a use case is a stand-alone entity – it encapsulates all the behaviour necessary to describe all the possible scenarios connected to achieving a particular end result. That’s what makes use cases such a powerful analysis tool – they give the system’s requirements context.  Use […]

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The Baker’s Dozen of Use Cases

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Rule 10:  The magical number seven (plus or minus two)

Psychologist George Miller, in his seminal 1956 paper "The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on Our Capacity for Processing Information", identified a limit on the capacity of human working memory. He found that adults have the capability to hold between five and nine ‘chunks’ of information at any one time. A ‘chunk’ may be a number, letter, word or some other cohesive set of data.

What has this […]

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The Baker’s Dozen of Use Cases

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Rule 9 – Build yourself a Data Dictionary

Transactions between the actors and the system typically involve the transfer of data.  This data has to be defined somewhere.  If you’ve built a Domain Model ( see Part 5 – here) most of the data will be identified there; but even then the class diagram is not always the most practical place to capture the sort of information you need to record.

Another way to capture this information […]

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The Baker’s Dozen of Use Cases

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

RULE 6: If it’s not on the Context or Domain models, you can’t talk about it

(If you haven’t already read it, I’d suggest having a quick look over Part 1 of the Baker’s Dozen to familiarise yourself with the fundamentals of use case descriptions.)

Engineers love to solve problems. It’s what they do. A use case model though is not a design model – it’s an analysis model. Use cases describe what the system should do, and in […]

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The Baker’s Dozen of Use Cases

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

RULE 5: Focus on goals, not behaviour

There is a subtle distinction between the functional behaviour of the system and the goals of the actors.   This can cause confusion: after all, the functional behaviour of the system must surely be the goal of the actor?
It is very common, then, for engineers to write use cases that define, and then describe, all the functions of the system.  It is very tempting to simply re-organise the software requirements into functional areas, each […]

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The Baker’s Dozen of Use Cases

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

RULE 4 : The “Famous Five” of requirements modelling

As I discussed in Rule 1, a common misunderstanding of use cases is that they are the software requirements. Unfortunately, this isn’t the situation. Use cases are merely an analysis tool – albeit a very powerful tool (when used in the right situation).

Use cases are just one technique for understanding and analysing the requirements. In order to fully understand the requirements our use cases are going to need some […]

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A Brief Introduction to Use Cases

Glennan Carnie

Glennan Carnie

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Latest posts by Glennan Carnie (see all)

Since Jacobson defined use cases back in 1992 they have been subject to a vast range of interpretations.   Alistair Cockburn, author of Writing Effective Use Cases states:

“I have personally encountered over 18 different definitions of use case, given by different, each expert, teachers and consultants”

I am no different: this is my personal interpretation of use case modelling and analysis.  To qualify this statement though, this methodology is based on nearly a decade of requirements definition work on a number high integrity projects, […]

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