Tag Archives: Modern C++. C++11. C++14

Practice makes perfect, part 3 – Idiomatic kata

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Previously, we looked at some of the foundational C++ code kata – that is, elements of C++ coding that are absolutely key to master if you’re going to be programming in C++.
Practice makes perfect, part 1 – Code kata
Practice makes perfect, part 2 – foundation kata

In this article I want to introduce what I call ‘idiomatic’ kata.  These exercises have a bit more latitude (and variation) in how they can be implemented.  In that respect they are closer to traditional […]

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Practice makes perfect, part 2 – foundation kata

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

In the previously article we looked at the need for repetitive practice – code kata.  In this article I want to  present some of my preferred foundational kata.

If you’re a beginner to C++ I recommend you fully internalize all these examples before having a look at the idiomatic kata.

If you’re a more experienced C++ programmer you may be looking at these kata and thinking “Jeez – these are so basic!  Who couldn’t do this!”.  Bear in mind though – we […]

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Practice makes perfect, part 1 – Code kata

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

Imagine you’re at a Jazz club, enjoying a smooth jazz quartet.  It’s time for the sax player’s solo.  All of a sudden, he stops the band, rifles in a bag a pulls out a book of music theory.

“What the?!” you think.

The saxophonist looks to the audience, “I’ve just got to look up the notes for E-flat minor.  I can never remember them.”

It’s understandable you’re unlikely be too impressed with this particular musician.

If you’re a musician, a sportsperson, a dancer, martial […]

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Function function return return values values*

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

The latest C++ standard is now upon us, so it’s time to have a look at some of its new features.

To put one of the new features into context we’re going to have a look at – as the title suggests – multiple function return values

I should really distinguish between the following:

A Subroutine (or Subprogram) is a parameterised block of code that can be called multiple times from within a program.
A Procedure is a subroutine that may have multiple input […]

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Celebrating 10 years – my top 10 blog articles

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

It’s difficult to believe we’ve been writing articles for 10 years.  In that time I’ve written over 90 technical articles on C, C++ and embedded system design.

To celebrate I’ve picked my ‘Top 10’ articles, with a little background into why I enjoyed writing them so much, or the story behind them.

So, sit back, cue up “At the Sign of the Swinging Cymbal“* and enjoy.

 

(* This really dates

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Thanks for the memory (allocator)

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

One of the design goals of Modern C++ is to find new ways – better, more effective – of doing things we could already do in C++.  Some might argue this is one of the more frustrating aspects of Modern C++ – if it works, don’t fix it (alternatively: why use lightbulbs when we have perfectly good candles?!)

This time we’ll look at a new aspect of Modern C++:  the Allocator model for dynamic containers.  This is currently experimental, but has […]

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Your handy cut-out-and-keep guide to std::forward and std::move

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

I love a good ‘quadrant’ diagram.  It brings me immense joy if I can encapsulate some wisdom, guideline or rule-of-thumb in a simple four-quadrant picture.

This time it’s the when-and-where of std::move and std::forward.  In my experience, when programmers are first introduced to move semantics, their biggest struggle is to know when (or when not) to apply std::move or std::forward.  Usually, it’s a case of “keep apply std::move until it compiles”.  I’ve been there myself.

To that end I’ve put together a […]

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Making things do stuff – Part 8

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

We’ve been using templates to provide a hardware register abstraction for use with hardware manipulation problems, typical of what you’d find in a deeply-embedded (“bare-metal”) system.

Previously, we looked at using trait classes to establish pointers and tag-dispatch to handle special-case registers, such as read-only or write-only register.

In this article we’re going to add some syntactic sugar to our Register class, to allow the developer to access individual bits in the register using array-index ([]) notation.  This will allow us to […]

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Making things do stuff – Part 7

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

In our previous article we explored using templates to build a generic ‘register’ type to allow programmers to access hardware without all the nasty syntax of integer-to-pointer casting, etc.

At the moment, this class gives us little extra functionality beyond cleaning up the syntax (although, in its favour, it also doesn’t incur any additional run-time cost/performance).

In this article we’re going to extend our design to consider special hardware register types – notably read-only and write-only registers – and see how we can […]

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Making things do stuff – Part 6

Technical Consultant at Feabhas Ltd
Glennan is an embedded systems and software engineer with over 20 years experience, mostly in high-integrity systems for the defence and aerospace industry.

He specialises in C++, UML, software modelling, Systems Engineering and process development.
Glennan Carnie

As code designers we tend to eschew specific ‘stove-pipe’ code in favour of reusable code elements.  Up until now we’ve been coding some very specific examples so it’s probably worth looking at some more generic solutions.

In this article we’ll look at building generic register manipulation classes (or, as one commenter referred to them, ‘register proxy’ classes).  Here, we’re really exploring code design rather than coding ‘mechanics’.  I’m using this to explore some factors like the balance between efficiency, performance and […]

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